BAHFest MIT 2018

BAHFest is a celebration of well-argued and thoroughly researched but completely incorrect scientific theory. Our brave speakers present their bad theories in front of a live audience and a panel of judges with real science credentials, who together determine who takes home the coveted BAHFest trophy. And eternal glory, of course. BAHFest returns to MIT in conjunction with MIT Lecture Series Committee and Cambridge Science Festival on Sunday, April 22nd at Kresge Auditorium. Show begins at 7PM.

Submit a talk!

Host and Judges

Ben Lillie

Ben Lillie

Host

Ben Lillie is a high-energy particle physicist who left the ivory tower for the wilds of New York’s theater district. He has a B.A. in physics from Reed College, a Ph.D. in theoretical physics from Stanford University, and a Certificate in improv comedy from the Upright Citizens Brigade Theater. He is the founder of Caveat, an event space dedicated to intellectual nightlife opening soon. He is also co-founder of The Story Collider, where people are invited to tell stories of their personal experience of science, is a Moth StorySLAM champion, and was a writer and contributing editor for TED.com.

TBD

Keynote

 

James Propp

James Propp

Judge

Jim Propp is a professor at UMass Lowell. He enjoys doing research, teaching, blogging, and tweeting about mathematics. He and his wife are midway through a long-term experiment converting two single-celled organisms into fully-functioning humans. Jim also won BAHFest East 2017 and is now the proud owner of the coveted Hennig Brand trophy and everlasting glory.

Max Tegmark

Max Tegmark

Judge

Max Tegmark is a professor doing physics and AI research at MIT, and advocates for positive use of technology as president of the Future of Life Institute. He is the author of over 200 publications as well as the New York Times bestsellers “Life 3.0: Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence” and “Our Mathematical Universe: My Quest for the Ultimate Nature of Reality”. His work with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey on galaxy clustering shared the first prize in Science magazine’s “Breakthrough of the Year: 2003.”

TBD

Judge

 

Presenters

TBD

Presenter